Apr 30: 

Buenos Aires, Scotland: the Estancia Villa Maria

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Back in cold and rainy New York, it’s strange to think that only a couple days ago I was in sunny Buenos Aires for the annual Leaders of Design Council conference.

But traveling North-South will do that to you. After an eleven hour flight, the timezone only changes one hour, but the season changes completely (and so does the language). It can make you feel like you’re in the Twilight Zone, or just a little jet-weary. 

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Apr 22: 

International Orange

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Last weekend, I bought a gallon of paint the color of the Golden Gate Bridge. (Sherwin Williams makes it - they’re the bridge’s official paint supplier.)

It’s known as “International Orange,” and it’s a great shade: iconic and attention-grabbing. It falls somewhere between Safety Orange and Fire Engine Red. 

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Mar 28: 

Lost Paradise

Ross Padluck, Associate at Ike Kligerman Barkley, guest blogs this week. He is the author of Catskill Resorts: Lost Architecture of Paradise.

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I’ve long been fascinated by the beauty and mystery of abandoned buildings. They’ve become a hobby of mine, and I’ve photographed and written extensively about them. One place that has captivated me more than any other is the long abandoned site of Grossinger’s Country Club in the Catskill Mountains. Particularly, the hotel’s mid-century indoor pool structure is still spectacular in its state of decay.

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Mar 14: 

Bungalow Heaven

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Walk around for a while in any American town, and you’ll probably find a bungalow. Or should I say you’ll probably find a bunch, clustered together, unassuming, petite. They’re a staple of American residential architecture that I’ve been thinking about a lot lately - partly because there are so many to think about!

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Mar 7: 

Another from the Shoe Box

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In the spirit of Joel’s shoe box archive, we blew the dust off a project from twenty years ago, the interior decoration of a grand old house in New Jersey. 

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Feb 28: 

Book Report: Las Casas del Pedregal: 1947-1968

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Today I will be reporting on Las Casas del Pedregal: 1947-1968.  A brief report—I haven’t actually read it, as I can’t read Spanish—but never mind.  It is the most hauntingly, beautifully sublime compilation of modernist images I’ve seen since middle school, when the miraculously stylized film strip version of Ray Bradbury’s "August 2026: There Will Come Soft Rains" triggered my preoccupation with modernist ruin.

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Feb 19: 

Architect of City and Country, Skyscraper and Suburb

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It seems an Ike Kligerman Barkley tradition to think about Frank Lloyd Wright on National Holidays. I continued it this President’s Day by paying a short visit to the exhibition dedicated to – as Joel wrote on the Fourth of July – “Our American Architect.”  

Frank Lloyd Wright and the City: Density vs. Dispersal” at the Museum of Modern Art took the architecture floor stateside for a change, following their exhibitions on Frenchmen Labrouste and Le Corbusier. (All three were curated by Barry Bergdoll.) 

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Feb 13: 

Art for the Masses

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Over the years, Keith York, who runs Modern San Diego, has introduced me to some of his mid-century buds in the region. The community is tight knit, and includes all sorts of artists, artisans, and owners of small companies native to California. It’s a group of people who live “mid-century,” surrounded by works from the movement that originated in their backyard.

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Feb 5: 

One from the Shoe Box 

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I found an old box of construction photos of a favorite project from about 15 years back. I think the images are so good they should see the light of day.

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Jan 30: 

Women Master Builders, Part I: Doris Duke and Shangri La

The raw cold of this January has my mind straying to warmer climes (I’m not the only one). But as I jump between thoughts of Palm Beach and the Bahamas, Los Angeles and Aruba, I keep coming back to a white washed compound on a bluff overlooking the Pacific.

imageMughal suite with stairs leading to the Jai Pavilion.

Shangri La, as that pardisial structure is known, was Doris Duke’s private retreat from her very public life as the “richest woman in the world,” and her large-scale hobby in an agenda filled with myriad pursuits. 

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